Second Conditional

We use the second conditional to talk about hypothetical or imaginary situations in the present or future. In the if-clause we use simple past or past continuous. In the other clause (consequence/result), we can use would, could or might. For the verb be we usually start our sentence with If + subject + were ForContinue reading “Second Conditional”

Conditionals and Future Time Clauses

We use the zero conditional to talk about something that is always true or always happens as a result of something else. You can use the simple present, present continuous or present perfect in either clause. We use the first conditional to talk about something that will probably happen in the future. You can useContinue reading “Conditionals and Future Time Clauses”

Indirect Questions

We use indirect questions when we want to ask a question in a more polite way. Let’s compare direct questions and indirect questions:  Grammar Practice Level of difficulty:   Speaking Practice Level of difficulty:  Change the direct question into an indirect one Discuss the question with your group. Give as many details as possible

Future Perfect vs. Future Continuous

Future Perfect We use the future perfect (will have + past participle) to say something that will be finished before a certain time in the future. Future Continuous We use the future continuous (will + be + verb+ing) to say that an action will be in progress at a certain time in the future. Let’sContinue reading “Future Perfect vs. Future Continuous”

Double comparatives

In English, we can use double comparatives to express cause and effect, or increasing or decreasing returns in parallel structures. There are three basic patterns to use double comparatives with nouns, actions, and adjectives/adverbs. Fun activities and playing games are great ways to improve your fluency. Here you can find 3 different activities to reviewContinue reading “Double comparatives”

Determiners: both, either … or, neither … nor

1. We use both to refer to two things, people, or animals together. We can use both + noun I like both coffee and tea. (I like coffee and I like tea) Both those women are my friends. (Those two women are my friends) We can use both of + an object pronoun We bothContinue reading “Determiners: both, either … or, neither … nor”

Quantifiers: all, most, every, and each

1.We use all + noun or all of the + a plural or uncountable noun all = in general all (of) the = specific All animals need food. All of the animals in the safari are dangerous. 2. We use everybody or everything + singular verb everybody = all people everything = all things EverybodyContinue reading “Quantifiers: all, most, every, and each”

Clauses of Purpose

To, in order to , as to, for, and so that are words that help us talk about purposes or goals clearly and fluently. Time to practice The best way to improve your English is by practicing. Don’t be afraid of making mistakes. Remember that practice makes progress.

Clauses of Contrast

Although, though, even though, in spite of, and despite are words that help us connect contrasting ideas clearly and fluently. We use them to introduce a clause in a sentence which is in contrast to another clause in the same sentence. You already know how to use basic connectors such as so and but. InContinue reading “Clauses of Contrast”

Reporting Verbs

Reporting verbs are verbs which are used to tell someone what another person said. They are used in reported speech. Say and tell are the most common reporting verbs. However, there are other reporting verbs that we can use instead of say an tell to communicate our ideas more clearly. Example: He said that heContinue reading “Reporting Verbs”